Bodog Leaving U.S. Online Gambling Market

28 July 2011

In a statement earlier this week, the Bodog Brand announced that as of December 2011, when their licensing agreement with Morris Mohawk Gaming to expires, they will no longer offer their services to the U.S. online gambling market.

In their statement they mentioned that as the brand grows into new markets they didn’t want to be affected by “negative perceptions”.  A reference perhaps to the online poker rooms that are being labeled by the U.S. government as being run outside the law or possibly related to problems involving Full Tilt Poker and not paying back their players.

The statement also mentions creating a “new chapter in its history”. This may include a future re-entry into the U.S. online gambling market if things should change as far as regulations are concerned in the United States. So far it seems, Bodog has not been in the fire of the U.S. Department of Justice , and by leaving the U.S. voluntarily may make it easier for a return when and if things change.

Here is the full statement from Bodog:

“Following recent news that Bodog UK has been granted a gambling license by the UK Gambling Commission, we are pleased to announce further developments to the Bodog brand going forward.

As highlighted last week, Bodog UK’s CEO, Patrik Selin believes the trust and credibility that having a UK license brings to the brand will benefit customers and allow him to attract the best talent in the industry to work with him.

However, in order to ensure the brand’s expansion is not affected by negative perceptions, both in the UK and elsewhere in emerging markets such as Asia, where Bodog88 is already successful, a decision has been made to withdraw the Bodog brand from the US market at the end of 2011. As a result, the Morris Mohawk Gaming Group’s (MMGG) brand licensing agreement will be allowed to expire on 31 December, following which US residents will no longer be able to access or any other Bodog branded website. We understand that MMGG will launch under its own brand in 2012, licensed by the Kahnawake Gaming Commission. All clients’ funds will remain safe and they will have the option to switch to a new MMGG brand should they wish but MMGG confirms it’s business as usual.

This decision presents a fresh direction for the as it looks to create a new chapter in its history. The move will enable the Bodog brand to continue its growth and expansion and maintain its position as the world’s largest gaming brand.”

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