Kentucky shows their true colors

17 March 2009

Finally, after all this time, the truth comes out in regards to the driving force behind Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear’s plight this past September in trying to seize 141 gambling-related domains. Judge Thomas Wingate presided over this case, and ruled in favor of Beshear; which was recently overturned in January.

Beshear and the “Justice and Public Safety Cabinet” of Kentucy is currently appealing this decision, which hasn’t yet been heard in the Kentucy Supreme Court. But, the heart of this story is Gov. Beshear’s reasoning behind this whole mess in the first place.

When Gov. Beshear started this crusade, his “official” reasons were to protect the children of Kentucky and other residents from the evils of online gambling – but yet TwinSpires.com, which allows both residents of Kentucky and everybody in the world to place wagers on Kentucky horse races, was not named in the list of Defendants (No person was named as a defendant, only the 141 domains in question) in his case.

Now many of us had put 2+2 together and knew long ago that the motive behind Beshear’s actions were based on greed and money. These reasons were only circumstantial at the time, but now they’re fact. Forbes released a story outlining Kentucky’s plans to install video gambling terminals (slots and other casino games) at various race tracks within their borders. It’s estimated that Kentucky can expect to receive hundreds of millions of dollars every year in additional revenue. Each horse racing outlet that installs these machines must pay licensing fees ranging anwhere from $25 to $125 million per year.

Be sure to check out the original story from Forbes, and a copy of HR158, which is expected to be heard as early as later this year.

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